Tag: Hatch

Aug 30 2018

Why Our Leatherback Eggs Did Not Hatch

By Mary Pringle for The Island Eye News Photos by Barb Bergwerf Many people have asked how the Leatherback nest laid in Wild Dunes did. Unfortunately the inventory conducted on August 10 when it was 73 days old and overdue showed that none of the 95 large eggs showed any sign of embryonic development. While …

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Jul 19 2017

Taking Inventory

By Mary Pringle for The Island Eye News Loggerhead nests have begun to hatch on the Isle of Palms. Nest #1 finally produced hatchlings after 70 days of incubation at 56th Ave. This was longer than usual because the average length is 45-60 days. These eggs depend on constant heat in the sun-warmed sand to …

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Sep 07 2016

Imagine A Turtle’s Start Inside Soft, Leathery Egg

By Mary Pringle for The Island Eye News Loggerhead eggs normally take 45 to 60 days to hatch. There is an amazing process involved from the time they are deposited in the sand by the mother until the hatchlings crawl to the ocean. Many things have to be just right for their successful emergence from the …

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Aug 16 2014

Hatching Time Is Here

  By Mary Pringle for Island Eye News Photos by Barb Bergwerf Loggerhead eggs normally take 45 to 60 days to hatch. Our first few nests have produced tiny loggerheads already. There is an amazing process involved from the time they are deposited in the sand by the mother until the hatchlings crawl to the …

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Apr 12 2012

Red-bellied Woodpecker

By Sarah Harper Diaz The Red-bellied Woodpecker is found in woodlands and suburban areas throughout the eastern half of the U.S. as far west as Texas and Nebraska. Males have a red cap which extends from the nape of the neck to the bill, while females have a red nape and a red spot above …

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Feb 14 2012

Black skimmer

By Sarah Harper Diaz The Black Skimmer is a very distinctive looking shorebird in the same order as gulls, terns, sandpipers, and plovers. There are only three species in the skimmer family and this is the only species found in North and South America. The skimmer is named for its foraging technique: It skims the …

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